Fulmars on the Nest

Fulmars on the Nest

In recent summers there appear to have been less and less fulmars frequenting my local cliffs. A survey of Northern Irelands seabirds states that between 2000 and 2013 there has been a 59% decline in the breeding population.

Could plastics in the marine environment be playing a part? In the North Sea over 95% of Northern Fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) were found to have plastic in their guts, with 98.6% in the English Channel. This included fishing line, sheet plastic, fibre sponge, rope, twine, Styrofoam, bottle caps and sweet wrappers. One bird was found with over 454 pieces of plastic in its gut!

Whilst the plastic may not directly kill the birds, it leaves less room for food as it does not break down easily in the stomach. We can all do our bit by reducing plastic usage.
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©Geoff Campbell Photography

Fulmars on the Nest

Fulmars on the Nest
In recent summers there appear to have been less and less fulmars frequenting my local cliffs. A survey of Northern Irelands seabirds states that between 2000 and 2013 there has been a 59% decline in the breeding population.

Could plastics in the marine environment be playing a part? In the North Sea over 95% of Northern Fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) were found to have plastic in their guts, with 98.6% in the English Channel. This included fishing line, sheet plastic, fibre sponge, rope, twine, Styrofoam, bottle caps and sweet wrappers. One bird was found with over 454 pieces of plastic in its gut!

Whilst the plastic may not directly kill the birds, it leaves less room for food as it does not break down easily in the stomach. We can all do our bit by reducing plastic usage.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer:
©Geoff Campbell Photography

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